hero

Auntie Speaks

Minorities

We need to show more sympathy for these people.
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They travel miles in the heat.

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They risk their lives crossing a border.

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They don’t get paid enough wages.

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They do jobs that others won’t do or are afraid to do.

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They live in crowded conditions among a people who speak a different language.
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They rarely see their families, and they face adversity all day ~ every day.
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I’m not talking about illegal Mexicans
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I’m talking about our troops!

Doesn’t it seem strange that so many are willing to lavish all kinds of social benefits on illegals, but don’t support our troops? Wouldn’t it be great if we took the $360,000,000,000 (that’s billion) we spend on illegals every year, and spent it on our troops!!!

A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America for any amount, up to and including their life.

Published: March 9, 2017

The Battered Badge

If you have 50 minutes to spare, please watch this video. It will give you some insight as to what we, in law enforcement, go through on our day to day jobs.

I consider myself to be one of the lucky ones. I was sent to the hospital twice, shot at twice (they missed both times) and sued in federal court once during my 31 years of service.

About 5 years into the job I lost a partner. He was ambushed outside his house at 1am. He lived in a changing neighborhood and didn’t want to move. He was killed because the hood rats didn’t want a sheriff living in the hood.

(Approximately 30 seconds of black screen starts the 1982 video)

Published: January 17, 2017

Owen J. Baggett – August 29, 1920 – July 27, 2006

May this World War 2 hero rest in peace.

Owen John Baggett was born in 1920 in Graham, Texas. By 1941 he graduated from college and went on to work on Wall Street, but by the following year, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps (now USAF) when the United States entered the war.

A studious man, he graduated from pilot training in just five months and was sent to Burma, flying a B-24 Liberator. What happened the following year is one of those amazing stories that I love.

On March 31st, 1943, Baggett and his squadron were sent on a mission to destroy a bridge of strategic importance. On their way, the B-24s got intercepted by Japanese Zeros which hit the squadron hard. Baggetts’ plane was riddled with bullets to such an extent that the crew was forced to bail out.

While parachuting, a Japanese pilot decided that downing the plane wasn’t enough. He circled around and started shooting at the bailed out pilots, killing two of the crew. Seeing this, Baggett did the only thing he could. He played dead.

Not convinced Baggett was dead, the Zero pulled up to him at near stall speed, the pilot opening his canopy to check on his horrendous work. Not wasting any time and thinking on his feet (no pun intended), Baggett pulled out his pistol and shot 4 times with at least one hitting the pilot in the head.

45 cal. M1911 pistol

This is considered the best shot by a .45 Caliber M1911 pistol of ALL TIME.

The last thing he saw was the Zero spiraling toward earth.

When he landed, he and the other bailed out crew members were captured and sent to a POW camp where they remained till the end of the war. They were liberated by OSS agents (World War II version of the modern CIA) and Baggett was recognized as the only person during the war to shoot down a Zero with a pistol.

Owen J. Baggett

Published: January 4, 2017

Pearl Harbor Tribute

Published: December 7, 2016

Mark “Oz” Geist

Mark “Oz” Geist is a member of the Annex Security Team that fought the Battle of Benghazi, Libya, from September 11 to September 12, 2012. A Colorado native, Mr. Geist joined the United States Marine Corps in 1984. During his time in the service, he served in Barracks Duty in the Philippines, then with the 2nd Battalion 9th Marines Golf Company, as well as the Surveillance and Target Acquisition Platoon. He then was chosen to serve in the newly formed Marine Cadre program as an Anti-/Counter- Terrorism Instructor. Upon the completion of a very successful tour and re-enlistment, Mr. Geist changed his military occupational specialty to the Intelligence field, specializing in Interrogation Translation. He attended language school where he studied Persian Farsi.

After serving 12 years in the United States Maine Corps, Mr. Geist became a Deputy Sheriff in Teller County, Colorado. In that role, he was assigned as liaison with the Vice Narcotics and Intelligence Unit in Colorado Springs, Colorado, as well as an Investigator for Crimes against Children. Certified as a Forensic Interviewer of children, he investigated numerous case of abuse in which he helped to secure convictions of the perpetrators. He then took a job as Chief of Police in Fowler, Colorado. After leaving the Fowler Police Department, Mr. Geist began his own business in private investigations as well as bounty hunting and bail bonds.

In 2004, Mr. Geist began doing contract security work in Iraq. He worked for Triple Canopy, providing Personal Security Details for Department of State personnel in Baquba, Iraq. Upon the completion of that contract he worked for USIS, the United States Investigative Services, training Iraqi SWAT teams and Personal Security Details. He also served as a mentor/advisor to the Personal Security Detail of Dr. Ayad Allawi, the former Prime Minister of Iraq.

Mr. Geist finished his career as a security contractor in Benghazi, Libya, where he was credited with helping to save the lives of more than 25 Americans. Mr. Geist is still recovering from the injuries he sustained in the battle. He is a co-author of the bestselling book 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi.

Published: October 28, 2016

Dear America

Published: September 12, 2016

Blue Line

Thin_Blue_Line

Many people have seen the above synbol and either wondered what it was or what it means. Many know that it has something to do with the police.

Here is the real meaning..

The Thin Blue Line is a symbol used by law enforcement, originating in the United Kingdom but now prevalent in the United States and Canada to commemorate fallen law enforcement officers and to symbolize the relationship of law enforcement in the community as the protectors of fellow civilians from criminal elements. It is an analogy to the term Thin Red Line.

Each stripe on the emblem represents certain respective figures: the blue center line represents law enforcement, the top black stripe represents the public whilst the bottom represents the criminals. The idea behind the graphic is that law enforcement (the blue line) is what stands between the violence and victimization by criminals of the would-be victims of crime.

Proponents of the symbol assert that the identifier is intended to show support for police. The Thin Blue Line Flag has become popular among law enforcement personnel, their families and supporters.

Published: May 18, 2016

Police Officers are scared

Yes. all law enforcement officers are scared. Police Officers, Correctional Officers, Deputy Sherifss, DEA Officers, Border Patrol, etc. All officers are scared because, they never know what the next second of their watch / shift will bring. At times it spills over to his / her off duty time.

I had the unfortunate privilege to stand a 20 minute guard position at the casket of a fallen officer and friend. He was ambushed, off duty, at about 1 AM outside his home. He lived in a changing neighborhood and the hood rats decided they didn’t want a Sheriff living in their hood.

Published: May 17, 2016